Monday, November 13, 2006

E-publishing vs. Mainstream

With all the new erotic imprints popping up everywhere, now seems like a great time for those of us who write erotic romance to take the plunge into mainstream, if we so desire it. What are your thoughts on submitting to a mainstream publisher, is it worth the added headache, or too much of a pain in the backside?

5 comments:

emily veinglory said...

I think it's a 'horses for courses' thing. I like to write m/m erotic romance novellas -- epublisher love it and sell it in pretty good numbers. When I wrote something novel length and in a publisher category, perhaps I'll look at larger romance presses. It isn't a main priority for me right now. Most of my novel length stuff is firmly in the fantasy genre instead...

Vincent Diamond said...

The great majority of my sales have been to print publishers. I'm kinda the oddball in the online m/m community because so many folks do focus on e-publishers.

As far as worth it. Well, it has been for me because I don't write novel-length material and the flat fee for short stories is usually at least $100. Few e-publishers pay that kind of money upfront for a short story.

Print publishers are slower, too. It takes them longer to do the paperwork, get the edits back, go to print, blah blah blah. But there's something very satisfying about picking up an antho in a bookstore and seeing your story there.

It's been good to see MJ Pearson and JM Snyder making the transition with print publishing. It's just a matter of time before there's a breakout m/m novel the way that Brokeback did in the theatres.

Anonymous said...

I just wonder exactly how long a print publisher takes from acceptance to release. Seems like epubs are getting slower all the time and there may not be that much of a differnce anymore.

One of my books, for example, won't release for 14 months. And that's with an epub.

Kis Lee said...

I mostly write short stories, and I like the immediacy of e-publishing. Quicker response and (usually) quicker payment.

I have a handful of stories in print (or soon-in-print) and it really is cool to see your name in a print book. I'll probably continue what I'm doing: submitting to both e-publishers and print publishers.

Jules Jones said...

I've got the problem of writing m/m cross-genre -- the romance print publishers don't want m/m, and the GLBT print publishers don't want romance and/or speculative fiction. Being a natural novella writer doesn't exactly help, although I've sold a couple of shorts to print markets. When I manage to bring something in under the maximum length for a print anthologies it goes to thhose slushpiles first, but I just don't write that many pieces that are short enough or long enough for the print markets.