Tuesday, November 06, 2007



I am not generally given to cover snark but I have to know. Am I the only one to read that title as 'Call of the Crumpet'? Does that have the same slang meaning in the US as it does back home?

7 comments:

Angela James said...

Hmm. No. Tell us the slang meaning. I'm dying to know, now!

Anonymous said...

I read it as 'trumpet' but I can see how it could be 'crumpet', which is far more hilarious. And considering her lack of dress, 'crumpet' is more appropriate.

Actually, I thought she was wearing newsprint. I had to look up the title to see what period of history the story's set in, because to my mind the cover doesn't do a very good job. The title sounds Napoleonic but the cover looks like someone's raided Conn Igguldon's bookshelves.

From the blurb, it sounds like something I'd enjoy reading, but I wouldn't have picked it up based on the cover, which still looks to me like 'woman dressed in newspapers runs through a khamsin.'

Linda

Madelynne Ellis said...

You mean it doesn't actually say Crumpet!

It's hilarious. Actually, I thought it was a mickey take.

Jules Jones said...

Oh. Oh dear.

No, I don't think Americans understand that particular usage unless they've been exposed to Brit humour. "Tiffin" is even worse, because you have to explain Carry On Up the Khyber as well, which is why my short that's an extended tea-and-tiffin joke continues to languish in the trunk.

Emily Veinglory said...

Angela, basically it's a way of refering to an attractive girl in a slightly off hand/possibly chauvinist way ;)

Karen Scott said...

Yay pop-up comments!!

And no you're not, I originally read it as 'crumpet' too.

Bernita said...

And I read "strumpet"...
And thought "wow!"