Sunday, November 04, 2007

Twilight Fantasies RIP?--veinglory


And the award for closure with least fanfare goes to... Twilight Fantasies. Opened in May, 2007 -- last seen alive in August 2007, website now missing. This might look like a web problem if the blogger blog was not also been closed--but the Myspace still seems somewhat active with a happy thanksgiving graphic loaded. Hmmm.

Also, small press distributor BookWorld is closing.

ETA: Twilight Fantasies closure confirmed by authors Heather Holland, Cassidy McKay and Becca.
Closure also reported by Brenda Moore.




Here are some more thoughts about the closure of Twilight Fantasies. First, it seems like there had been a prior exodus of their authors. For example:

October 17th: Ava Rose Johnson
"I wanted to let any of you who are interested know that I am no longer affiliated with Twilight Fantasies. Midnight Melody is not available on their website anymore. I am looking forward to moving on from this..."
Undated: Pamela K Kinney
"Letting all know I asked for rights back to his Girl and The Curse from Twilight Fantasies. There are reasons, but that's between me and TFP."

If you see discreet announcements like this in the future I would really appreciate being sent a note about it. This seems to be one of the reliable indicators that a press is circling the drain.

My second observation is that some authors are mentioning that as this is the third or fourth of their publishers to fold, there is something increasingly wrong with epublishing. I would respectably suggest that losing one or two presses may surely be simple bad luck, a greater number may suggest that it is time to submit to more stable companies. For a start, try selecting presses that have been around for at least a year?

There is no need to place orphaned manuscripts rapidly with the first press that will take them, or indeed solicit them actively (watch out for ambulance chasers). The loss of a press might be a great chance to take stock, re-edit and aim a little higher?

4 comments:

Karen Scott said...

My second observation is that some authors are mentioning that as this is the third or fourth of their publishers to fold, there is something increasingly wrong with epublishing.

I would suggest that desperation to sell one's books was a major factor, as to why some of these authors keep experiencing epub closures. I'd never even heard of Twilight whatever it's called.

By the way, I would really appreciate a comments pop-up box, this blogger comments page is such a pain.

Emily Veinglory said...

I'll see what I can do about the popping of upness.

Lynne Connolly said...

This is typical new market behaviour. Before I was a full-time writer, I was a marketing consultant, specialising in new market development.
We're in the shake-out phase, when barriers to entry are rising and many market participants drop out. The market ends up with a central company, a good second brand and several niche specialists. Then it moves into maturity.
We're currently entering the shake-out phase, which will probably continue for a while. So definitely try to sign with companies who have a better than average chance of surviving this. I've been telling people for years that this would happen, but I'm no happier when I see my friends suffering when yet another publisher goes down.
On the other hand, it might lead to higher and more reliable levels of quality.

Angela James said...

There is no need to place orphaned manuscripts rapidly with the first press that will take them, or indeed solicit them actively (watch out for ambulance chasers). The loss of a press might be a great chance to take stock, re-edit and aim a little higher?

This is really excellent advice, Emily. I wish more people would listen to this.