Sunday, May 25, 2008

Shadowfire Press


Shadowfire Press, owned by Michael Barnette, opens August first. Contracting work by query or "contest" (no prize other than acceptance). Royalties are on net. Seeking paranormal BDSM.

See also:
Another New E-pub

26 comments:

Fae Sutherland said...

I find it odd and rather unprofessional when members of a pub's staff are listed with screen names instead of actual names. Even a pen name is better that that. Auburnimp? Sounds like someone who should be on my Myspace buddy list, not financial officer of a business. She/he might be entirely capable, but the use of internet an screen name for business purposes sure doesn't give much confidence. Just my opinion.

Emily Veinglory said...

I just assume any name that long is in Welsh. No?

Anonymous said...

Give me a break....

Officer/Partnner (sic) Auburnimp!!! Would you trust a company who can't even spell the word "partner" let alone having someone with that false name on a website? Even in the submission guidelines, simple words such as "overall" are misspelled.

Can't wait to see all the usual authors flock to them...then can't wait for the show when they fall apart in about 3-6 months and all those authors are "so shocked."

Anonymous said...

Another thing...I also see they're publishing (should be re-re-re-re-re-re-republishing) Glenda Woodrum's trilogy. That doesn't give me any confidence either, considering it's been published with just about every e-pub out there for the past 10 years.

Mary Winter said...

Must confess, that the use of a screenname concerns me as do the typos. Sure, that screen name could be quite well known in fan circles (though Auburnimp is a bit generic to be really really well known), but still, that individual is the financial person for their business. To present a professional appearance they could be (Real Name, aka Auburnimp). And if they don't want their real name known...well that's a big red flag right there.

Still, one hopes that they have nothing but the best intentions and that they, and their authors, will have many sales.

Coyote said...

My. Look at all the claws and fangs. I'd say I was shocked, but this is the internet.

Generally, when I see people picking at something foolish about a person, instead of making reasonable comments, I assume that it's because they really don't have anything sensible to say.

Any fool can write a bad review, and as any fool can make fun of a name.

I've read Glenda Woodrum's books - they're excellent. In a world of small press publishers who can't get to press (I've been there), it's not necessarily a problem with a book that causes it to be "republished" by more than one house.

Coyote said...

And by the way, from what I understand - as for "re-re-re publishing" some of those books were with a publisher who made such unacceptable edits that the author felt forced to retract the books before they were published, and one was with a publisher that sat on them for years (along with many others), without releasing them.

Only one of those books, which were accepted by publishers, actually ever came out. That's not the fault of the author.

Coyote said...

And since we're making fun of names... my name _is_ Coyote. ; )

Personally, I think "anonymous" is a much funnier name,

Anonymous said...

can't blame an author for pulling her books from a publisher that's usually 6 months/2 years behind putting the product out... and then blames the author when the book doesn't sell!

Anonymous said...

Actually Auburnimp is her pen name and her books sell very well.

Also, there is a reason that her real name is not used out in the open on the internet where anyone can associate her pen name with her real name.

I am sure though on business documents, which usually should be kept confidential, that her real name will be used.

Everyone try to remember that not all new publishers are shady or out to screw the authors.

Deb

kirsten saell said...

It is nice, though, to have an actual name so we can know who's running the show.

M Barnette said...

Thank you for pointing out the typos, they have been fixed.

Also, the contest has been changed to a limited open call.

Auburnimp, whose name I withheld for the sake of her privacy, is now listed on the site under both her real and pen name.

Emily Veinglory said...

Hi there Michael,

All new presses get treated a bit cynically fresh out of the gate. But the good ones go onwards and upwards from there :) Nice to see you.

M Barnette said...

Hi Emily,

We've all had bad experiences. I've had a few not so great ones myself. Being able to see this from both sides is one of the assets I feel I'm bringing to Shadowfire Press.

Auburnimp said...

I was intending to ignore all the comments but one, and I'm sorry Em it was yours, stuck in my craw.

Auburnimp is my pen name. It is NOT even remotely Welsh. For someone so sure of their literary credentials, I'd have thought you'd have recognised the source for the name. It is from your own countrywoman Anne Rice. Lestat always refers to Armand as a demon or imp and Armand has auburn hair.

I did say that my real name should be associated with with the business side of Shadowfire and, if you care to look, you'll see that it is now on the site.

Tell me people, does it mean more to you than my pen name?

Emily Veinglory said...

Okay, so Michael impressed me with a professional understanding of how to take the slings arrows (and little jokes) of online commentary. This, not so much. But hey, I learned something new. It seems Anne Rice is a New Zealander.

Emily Veinglory said...

p.s. Coyote, would be the same Coyote who lists themself as working for Shadowfire, perhaps?

Anonymous said...

"Tell me people, does it mean more to you than my pen name?"

When the name follows "Chief Financial Officer" and one knows that if they were to be published, they would be handing over personal info like social security numbers, etc, then yes having a real name lends considerable credibility that would be important to me.

M Barnette said...

That would be a former incarnation that I ran. At that time Shadowfire published poetry chapbooks and a free goth zine called evernight. The zine was partially paid for by ads from local companies. I'm sure you've noticed mention of poetry chapbooks and evernight as information regarding some of our old poets and authors and artists have information on those chapbooks we did that can stillb e found online to this day. Coyote did some of the graphic design then, but he is not part of the current incarnation of Shadowfire Press.

At the time I ran the poetry and zine version of Shadowfire Press printing of the chapbooks, and about 50% of the cost of the zine were all paid for out of my own pocket. I made no money on them. The authors paid no money for them, not even for the copies they were sent.

When the chapbooks were being done, this situsation was not unusual in small press. It was a 'for the love' endeavor. We're talking the late 90s here. There are still a few of these types of publishers around, but most ebook authors are unaware of them.

And small press print goth zines are where I got my start as a poet.

You can still find information on these sort of small presses here:
http://ralan.com/

In case you're curious.

Emily Veinglory said...

Trying to run a zine was how I learned I was never going to make it as an editor/organiser and should stick to writing. I ended up about $100 with a lot of people hating me. Oh and carpel tunnel from doing my own binding (staple and cloth tape binding)

M Barnette said...

I really enjoyed being an editor and that's why I'm the EiC.

I also got published by Kate Hill who did Tears on Black Roses.

Small world isn't it?

As far as not wanting to give out Auburnimp's real name on the internet, this is not a safe world we live in and many lady authors use pseudonyms to protect themselves. It was my decision not to use a lady's real name on a website where anyone, including people with not so good intentions, might see it. Her real name appears on all legal documents, but would have been protected by our standard non-disclosure form. Now it's out there where anyone can see it because some people felt the need to push the issue, rather than consider how dangerous the world we live in can be.

In the future, please keep in mind that the world is full of all sorts of people, some of whom are not mentally stable and can pose a danger. I personally know two authors with stalkers, and both of them, unfortunately, used their real names for on their books.

Emily Veinglory said...

I think we're pretty aware of that, it's come up in the past from presses who didn't list staff names at all. The response is to two aspects. One is having a financial post with a fanficcy name, not looking 'serious'. The other is that most of the top epublishers do in fact give the main officers real names and so obviously hve some way to manage the risk, or think it worth taking. So no matter the reason something that isn't a name and doesn't look like one looks less serious that the epresses we already know and trust. Of course it is a one word pseud that has been in continuous use for a while and so can be 'checked out' which is a bonus.

The only red flag for me so far is that you seem to have two staff members who responded rather defensively when some dared to not totally love everything about the press. Whether you take it on board or not, criticism is going to be part of the start-up process. Some online criticism is valid, some is not, none of it is worth getting upset about.

Emily Veinglory said...

p.s. I would note that the name thing actually didn't bother me at all, but it did bopther some of my author readers. I think that makes it worth being aware of?

Fae Sutherland said...

To explain a bit better why the name thing bothered me, personally. It's because, as Em said, you're asking authors to hand over to you something that took them months, maybe even years, to create, something that is *worth* a lot to them and maybe worth money too. Speaking for myself, I am not comfortable giving my work to people behind masks. If a press goes under, like SO many have the past year or so, where does that leave the author? Knowing they've been screwed, ripped off and not even knowing who did it. So that same person could, potentially, come back and do it again and again and the author would have no idea.

I'm not implying that Shadowfire intends to rip anyone off, but as an author yourself, wouldn't you all require that you know at the very least the NAME of the people you are handing your art over to?

That's the main reason the lack of real names bothered me. I think it's ridiculous to expect anyone to trust people who are no more than shadows.

Anonymous said...

I have to say I barely trust those with full (real)names on their website much more one with a screen name. That is NOT professional at all! I am not implying that she/he isnt a trustworthy person because I dont know he/she but if something goes wrong you cant sue a screen name or you cant research a screen name...

K. Z. Snow said...

I'm afraid I must agree with other (non-publisher-affiliated) commenters. Whimsical screen names and typos, as well as author-owners, seem indicative of writers rushing to set up their own e-pub(s) for the sake of publishing their own work.

I could easily be wrong, of course. I'm just conveying a first impression. (And, damn, I didn't know Louisiana and California were now in New Zealand! I always thought NZ was a power-hungry little wannabe "empire", resentful of existing in England'a and Australia's shadows. This only confirms it. Now, I must go and catch up on current geography.)