Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Simplified First Month Data--vinglory



As a rule of thumb where the error bars do not overlap, as is the case between Ellora's Cave and Samhain (shown by the pink box) the difference is statistically significant.

9 comments:

Angie said...

Question about data collection. My royalty statements show sales per quarter; they're not broken down month-by-month. How would you handle that data? Or does it just not fit?

Also, short stories seem to sell less well than novels, so a relatively low sales number when compared with other numbers from novels can be deceiving. Do you differentiate between those? Or just not want numbers from shorts? Or...?

I've only sold shorter works so far, and only have numbers by the quarter, so I'm not sure you'd be interested in input from me.

Thanks,

Angie

Anonymous said...

I concur on the quarterly numbers. Several presses only pay out/compile sales data quarterly, which renders the first-month sales data meaningless if you leave that info out.

It also doesn't take into account that some pubs (including my own) spend significant time and energy promoting their backlists, to the point that some titles sell more robustly the longer they are out.

Emily Veinglory said...

First month data is what it is. I use first quarter if first month is not available--which is blatantly unequal. However it is also the largest data set I have meaning that although less valid the information is probably more accurate than any of the other data points I have. Perhaps the most important data, copies sold in total from release to earn out, is impossioble to provide as almost nobody has reported it! I will be posting first year data shortly.

Anonymous said...

You can't really report "earn out" as long as a book is still available for sale. "Earn out" is by definition how much $4 a book earns before it goes out of print. And since a lot of ebooks remain available for sale indefinitely, it's hard to calculate true "earn out".

One of my ebook titles that is over three years old and had pretty much stopped selling just started selling well again after several of my current titles became bestsellers.

You don't have good earnout reports for several years after initial release. That's why you're missing that data.

Emily Veinglory said...

I define 'earn out' as the book is no longer for sale by the press that bought FNADR or FNWDR. I have several such books in the data set where rights have reverted.

Of course one has to wait for that to happen before being able to collect the data. So there is less data in that area. That being my point.

p.s. for the full data set refer to the website, the blog only shows recently updated snippets.

fiona glass said...

It's interesting to see that for first month sales at least, there is now little difference between the listed publishers with the (obvious!) exception of Ellora's Cave...

Emily Veinglory said...

The first year data is even more interesting in that EC's lead is nowhere near as obious by that point.

Anonymous said...

EC's quality is waaaaaay down, plus they're offering a lot more new titles at a time, which is diluting their per-title sales.

Fae said...

With EC you definitely make the bulk of your money in the first two months after release. There are spikes of backlist titles when a new release comes out but the vast majority of an EC book's sales are, in my experience anyway, in the first two months. Those 4 figure checks are sure nice to receive, though, rather than spread out over a couple of years. I'm impatient though, lol, and I like getting my money in a large lump amount instead of filtered out over many months.

YMMV, of course. :)